Monday, 29 January 2007

HELPing hand in Shrewsbury

Businesses in Shrewsbury were so impressed with an interactive law forum held in Telford – they’ve asked for their own.

The HR and Employment Law in Practice forum, otherwise known as HELP, is organised by Martin-Kaye Solicitors, in Telford, and has been running for the past 12 months.

Now, as a result of customer demand, the law firm has joined forces with National Westminster Bank to organise a series of similar sessions in Shrewsbury.

Graham Davies, senior partner at Martin-Kaye, said: “We aim not just to tell people about what’s happening in Employment Law, but to offer them a chance to network with other employers and Human Resources people to discuss local trends.

“We knew the sessions were effective, and that we were generating a lot of interest, and it’s excellent news that businesses in Shrewsbury are keen to hear more about the advice we have to offer.

The first Shrewsbury workshop was held at The Lord Hill Hotel in the town, with many major local business names attending, and more companies are already showing an interest in the next event.

Brian Seadon, Senior Manager (Commercial Banking) from NatWest, said: “Employment Law is something all businesses have to grapple with and it is vital they get expert advice.

“We are pleased to be able to be part of these forums to help them find that support, and to offer added value to our services.”

The team is now planning to run the Shrewsbury forum for at least the next 12 months, and the sessions will be held every other month.

Pic: At the first Shrewsbury Help forum are, from left, John Mehtam (Martin-Kaye Employment Law Specialist), Brian Seadon (NatWest Bank), Graham Davies (Martin-Kaye Senior Partner), and Adele Robinshaw (NatWest Bank)

Wednesday, 17 January 2007

Warning for Bosses

Shropshire Businesses must make sure they are aware of the most significant transformation of company law in decades.

That's the warning from Stuart Haynes at Martin Kaye Solicitors, The Foundry, Euston Way, Telford, following the introduction of the new Companies Act.

"The new act bring the most wide-ranging changes to that legal system that many people can remember for a long time", he said

Stuart said the new legislation would have an impact on all private and public companies, as its far-reaching reforms cover such a vast area of law.

"The Companies Act 2006 is the result of a Department of Trade and Industry review, which was launched as far back as 1998", he said.

"If you ignore the new legislation, you and your employees will be taking unnecessary risks, and you could face serious consequences"

"In another twist, the position of all company secretaries in private companies is now voluntary, and auditors can agree with companies a limit to their liabilities."

Monday, 1 January 2007

Warning for Bosses

Shropshire Businesses must make sure they are aware of the most significant transformation of company law in decades.

That's the warning from Stuart Haynes at Martin Kaye Solicitors, The Foundry, Euston Way, Telford, following the introduction of the new Companies Act.

"The new act bring the most wide-ranging changes to that legal system that many people can remember for a long time", he said

Stuart said the new legislation would have an impact on all private and public companies, as its far-reaching reforms cover such a vast area of law.

"The Companies Act 2006 is the result of a Department of Trade and Industry review, which was launched as far back as 1998", he said.

"If you ignore the new legislation, you and your employees will be taking unnecessary risks, and you could face serious consequences"

"In another twist, the position of all company secretaries in private companies is now voluntary, and auditors can agree with companies a limit to their liabilities."

Protecting your ideas from risks

Shropshire companies are being urged to protect their work when it comes to business deals with other firms.

Stuart Haynes, of Martin Kaye Solicitors in Euston Way, Telford, said that at some time up to 70 per cent of directors had been known to risk their business ideas.

"This is known as intellectual property and is basically anything that your business creates, including an idea, a design, a work of art, or even a way of doing something that's unique.

"Anything you create in your business is yours, and should be formally protected, otherwise a competitor, or even someone you have hired to work for you could steal your ideas"

Stuart said many companies wrongly assumed that they owned the copyright on any work carried out by a third party they had hired, such as a designer.

"But if fact, if you're not careful, and if there is no written agreement, it is unlikely that the copyright will be yours, even though you've paid for the work and it's related to your business."

"This could mean the designer could sell the work to one of your rivals or even set up business themselves using those designs."

Stuart said companies could protect themselves by including a clause in their contractor's agreement which made it clear the company owned the copyright and intellectual property in anything that was produced.

"It isn't necessary to register the copyright in any original material you've created as you will have automatic protection. But you could use the copyright symbol on your business documents and include a copyright notice, which will make it clear you take the issue seriously. And if someone asks if they can use the material, agree in writing what you are prepared to allow them to do by creating a copyright licence agreement - you can also charge them a fee for using your work. Its vital that companies protect themselves from this king of issue, as intellectual property plays a crucial role in business success"

Newsletter Number 15

Issue 15 Front CoverIssue 15 Business deals success

Martin Kaye Solicitors is developing a growing reputation for handling high profile international deals.

» Read more