Thursday, 19 April 2018

Cross border divorce is an issue

England could face a deluge of divorce cases from the other home nations if an estranged wife wins her current court case.

The wife and her aristocratic husband – who is a relative of the Duchess of Cornwall – are locked in a legal battle about whether arguments over their divorce settlement should be held in an English or Scottish court.

And now, family law expert Gemma Himsworth of Martin-Kaye Solicitors in Telford, said if the wife wins, the case would set a precedent that could bring a huge increase in similar claims.

“The case involves Charles Villiers and his estranged wife, Emma, who lived for all but one year of their 17-year marriage in Scotland. They separated in 2012, and Mr Villiers filed for divorce in Scotland in 2014. But Mrs Villiers applied to the English courts three months later for financial maintenance of £10,000 a month.”

Mrs Himsworth said under Scottish law, inherited wealth is not taken into account when assets are divided, and maintenance payouts are generally limited to three years. “But here in England, a divorcee can secure financial support for the rest of her life from her former spouse.”

In 2016, the courts decided the English High Court could help Mrs Villiers because she was then “habitually resident” in England – they ruled Mr Villiers should pay her £5,500 a month to cover interim maintenance while the divorce is finalised and her legal bills.

“Now though, Mr Villiers is challenging the ruling and insisting that an English judge had no right to intervene in a Scottish divorce. The case is still ongoing but once it has been decided, if Mrs Villiers wins then England and Wales could see a real surge in similar cases from Scotland, and an increase in the arguments between spouses about which court should hear their dispute.

“Mr Villiers claims that his wife is ‘trying it on’ and that the courts should throw out her case.

“It remains to be seen who will win their claim, but it’s clear that the case could be a turning point in the way cross-border divorces are handled and the way that settlements are decided, so we will be watching closely to see how things develop.”

Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Are networking events a data risk?

Most Shropshire businesses should by now be aware of the new data protection rules that will come into force in just a few weeks.

But how will the legislation affect any contact details you collect at networking events across the county?

Graham Davies, of Martin-Kaye Solicitors in Telford, said: “It’s a tried and tested approach – you attend a networking meeting and automatically swap business cards with the other people you meet at the event.

“But under the new General Data Protection Regulation policy that takes effect on May 25th, surely you’re breaching the rules unless you inform your new contacts about how you’re planning to use the information?

“In fact, as you have exchanged personal data at a business event, it’s clear that both parties can reasonably expect their new contact will be in touch at a later date – otherwise why would you have handed over your business card?

“So in this situation, under GDPR you wouldn’t need to request permission to use the contact details, and you can rely on the fact your new contacts must have been interested in hearing from you by virtue of them giving you their details.”

Mr Davies said technically the new rules would require you to provide a full description of how you were planning to use the information, but common sense should be applied.

“If you’re hosting an exhibition stand at the networking event and collecting business cards from delegates, you’d be wise to display a statement that explains you may use the details later. If you don’t have a stand, maybe ask your new contact if they’d like to be included on your mailing list as they hand over their card – you need to make sure they realise that you may be in touch.

“Then when you first make contact following the event, ensure there’s a clear link to your privacy notice, and always remind your contacts that they have the right to opt out of any further marketing communications.

“The new GDPR rules are complicated and will apply to all businesses, regardless of their size or sector, but when it comes to face-to-face networking, there is room for more flexibility given the setting where it happens.”